Being the Self-Differentiated Leader (HL101)

Differentiation of Self

Source:  Bowen Center for the Study of the Family

Families and other social groups tremendously affect how people think, feel, and act, but individuals vary in their susceptibility to a “group think” and groups vary in the amount of pressure they exert for conformity.  These differences between individuals and between groups reflect differences in people’s levels of differentiation of self.  The less developed a person’s “self,” the more impact others have on his functioning and the more he tries to control, actively or passively, the functioning of others.  The basic building blocks of a “self” are inborn, but an individual’s family relationships during childhood and adolescence primarily determine how much “self” he develops.  Once established, the level of “self” rarely changes unless a person makes a structured and long-term effort to change it.

People with a poorly differentiated “self” depend so heavily on the acceptance and approval of others that either they quickly adjust what they think, say, and do to please others or they dogmatically proclaim what others should be like and pressure them to conform.  Bullies depend on approval and acceptance as much as chameleons, but bullies push others to agree with them rather than their agreeing with others.  Disagreement threatens a bully as much as it threatens a chameleon. An extreme rebel is a poorly differentiated person too, but he pretends to be a “self” by routinely opposing the positions of others.

A person with a well-differentiated “self” recognizes his realistic dependence on others, but he can stay calm and clear headed enough in the face of conflict, criticism, and rejection to distinguish thinking rooted in a careful assessment of the facts from thinking clouded by emotionality.  Thoughtfully acquired principles help guide decision-making about important family and social issues, making him less at the mercy of the feelings of the moment.  What he decides and what he says matches what he does.  He can act selflessly, but his acting in the best interests of the group is a thoughtful choice, not a response to relationship pressures.  Confident in his thinking, he can either support another’s view without being a disciple or reject another view without polarizing the differences.  He defines himself without being pushy and deals with pressure to yield without being wishy-washy.

Every human society has its well-differentiated people, poorly differentiated people, and people at many gradations between these extremes.  Consequently, the families and other groups that make up a society differ in the intensity of their emotional interdependence depending on the differentiation levels of their members.  The more intense the interdependence, the less the group’s capacity to adapt to potentially stressful events without a marked escalation of chronic anxiety.  Everyone is subject to problems in his work and personal life, but less differentiated people and families are vulnerable to periods of heightened chronic anxiety which contributes to their having a disproportionate share of society’s most serious problems.

 

MATERIALS:

How to Be True to Yourself and Still Have Friends from Family Ties That Bind: A Self-Help Guide to Change through Family of Origin Therapy by Dr. Ronald W. Richardson (2011) pp. 35-51

How to Be True to Yourself and Still Have Friends – Ronald W. Richardson  (Alternate download0

 

3 comments on “Being the Self-Differentiated Leader (HL101)

  1. Frank D. Coon, III on

    I could not get “How to Be True to Yourself…” to open properly. I clicked on the link, another tab opened, the document is nine pages long, but no words or images appear. I see it comes from Dropbox (which I use regularly in and out of church). Not sure if the file needs to be reloaded into Dropbox or something on my end.

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